Pancreatitis in dogs and steroids

With rabbit, venison and bison being the most lean in pet foods (surprisingly, raw chicken diets by Nature’s Variety are higher in fat; I believe it’s the amount of skin that must get ground in), I took a look at some options to get the fat down to about 10% dry matter.  Remember that with a lower fat diet, you have to feed more to get the same amount of calories, especially for an active dog like Max.  So the following are just suggestions for you to follow up on, considering your dog’s caloric needs and the ingredients involved:

Risks
There are many suggested causes of pancreatitis including obesity, high-fat diets, liver disease , certain medications, toxins, and infection. Even if your dog doesn’t normally eat a high-fat diet, the introduction of a large amount of fatty food all at once can cause pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can occur in any dog but some breeds are more susceptible to this disease than others, including the miniature schnauzer , miniature poodle, and cocker spaniel . Additionally, pancreatitis is more common in older dogs, overweight dogs, and females. Dogs that get into garbage are much more likely to develop pancreatitis, so be sure to keep trash out of your dog’s reach!

Radiographs are not preferred but may be valuable in eliminating other causes of clinical signs. Classic radiographic changes seen in the dog, but not the cat, include decreased abdominal detail, cranial abdominal mass effect, widening of the juncture between the pylorus and duodenum, displacement of the stomach, and ileus. Abdominal ultrasound is preferred. The pancreas may be surrounded by fluid, enlarged, heterogenous, hypoechoic, or contain fluid-filled structures. A hypoechoic pancreas with hyperechoic peripancreatic fat is suggestive of pancreatic necrosis. A heterogenous pancreas is more suggestive of fibrosis seen with chronic pancreatitis. Unfortunately for cats ultrasonographic changes of the pancreas are not as reliable indicators of pancreatitis. Ultrasound has the additional advantage of the ability to sample the pancreas and visualize other abdominal structures. Pancreatic cytology is done with needle aspirates. Pancreatic aspirates may be helpful in cases of acute pancreatitis by identifying pancreatic necrosis. Aspirates are also useful in diagnosing pancreatic neoplasia. Cross-sectional imaging has not been studied extensively in dogs and cats for the diagnosis of pancreatitis.

Your veterinarian will also check for the presence of gallstones , and for a condition referred to as reflux . A fill blood work up will be ordered to see if there are any nutrient imbalances, and X-ray imaging will be used to look for evidence of any blunt damage to the pancreas. Pancreatic and liver enzymes will be measured to analyze for increases of either in the bloodstream. Insulin will me measured to check for normal levels, since inflammation can cause insulin producing cells in the pancreas to be damaged, possibly leading to diabetes. Diabetes is rare, but can occur, especially with dogs.

Pancreatitis in dogs and steroids

pancreatitis in dogs and steroids

Your veterinarian will also check for the presence of gallstones , and for a condition referred to as reflux . A fill blood work up will be ordered to see if there are any nutrient imbalances, and X-ray imaging will be used to look for evidence of any blunt damage to the pancreas. Pancreatic and liver enzymes will be measured to analyze for increases of either in the bloodstream. Insulin will me measured to check for normal levels, since inflammation can cause insulin producing cells in the pancreas to be damaged, possibly leading to diabetes. Diabetes is rare, but can occur, especially with dogs.

Media:

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